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dc.coverage.spatialGenevaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T04:05:08Z
dc.date.available2019-05-16T04:05:08Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-30
dc.identifier.citationOcean heat hits record high - UN. (2019, March 30). Manila Bulletin, pp. 1, 5.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/5935
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectMarine organismsen
dc.subjectOceansen
dc.subjectSurface temperatureen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectAir temperatureen
dc.subjectGreenhouse effecten
dc.subjectThermal expansionen
dc.subjectSea level changesen
dc.titleOcean heat hits record high - UNen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spage1en
dc.citation.epage5en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20190330_1en
local.seafdecaqd.extractOcean heat hit a record high in 2018, the United Nations said Thursday, raising urgent new concerns about the threat global warming is posing to marine life. In its latest State of the Climate overview, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reaffirmed that the last four years had been the hottest on record—figures previously announced in provisional drafts of the flagship report. But the final version of the report highlighted worrying developments in other climate indicators beyond surface temperature.en
local.subject.personalNameGuterres, Antonio
local.subject.corporateNameWorld Meteorological Organization (WMO)en
local.subject.corporateNameUnited Nations (UN)en
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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