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dc.coverage.spatialTañon Straiten
dc.coverage.spatialGuihulnganen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-03T07:31:45Z
dc.date.available2019-01-03T07:31:45Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-01
dc.identifier.citationIllegal fishing, commercial fishers still abound in Tañon Strait. (2015, October 1). Manila Bulletin, p. B-7.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/3352
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectIllegal fishingen
dc.subjectCommercial fishingen
dc.subjectFishersen
dc.subjectFishingen
dc.subjectExplosive fishingen
dc.subjectMarine parksen
dc.subjectCyanidesen
dc.subjectCoralen
dc.subjectPredatorsen
dc.subjectFishing gearen
dc.titleIllegal fishing, commercial fishers still abound in Tañon Straiten
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB-7en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20151001_B-7en
local.seafdecaqd.extractDynamite and cyanide fishing, and commercial fishing operations still abound in Tañon Strait, the country's largest marine protected area between Cebu and Negros islands. These were the findings of a recent seven-day expedition conducted by Oceana, an international non-government organization (NGO) focused in marine conservation. “The team has gathered valuable information, and testimonies of small fisherfolk and local barangay and municipal officials, confirming that illegal fishing activities, particularly dynamite and cyanide fishing, and commercial vessels are operating with impunity in Tañon Strait,” said Gloria Estenzo Ramos, vice president of Oceana Philippines.en
local.subject.personalNameFlores, Jimely
local.subject.personalNameOcampo, Daniel
local.subject.personalNameRamos, Gloria Estenzo
local.subject.corporateNameOceana Philippinesen


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