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dc.coverage.spatialAntarcticaen
dc.coverage.spatialGreenlanden
dc.coverage.spatialWashingtonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-27T05:14:01Z
dc.date.available2018-06-27T05:14:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-15
dc.identifier.citationSea level rise accelerating. (2018, February 15). Manila Bulletin, p. B8.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/334
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttp://wgxa.tv/news/nation-world/satellites-show-warming-is-accelerating-sea-level-riseen
dc.subjectSea levelen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectIce meltingen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectFloodingen
dc.subjectWeatheren
dc.subjectClimateen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectCoalen
dc.subjectNatural gasen
dc.titleSea level rise acceleratingen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB8en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20180215_B8en
local.seafdecaqd.extractMelting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers who published in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.en
local.subject.personalNameNerem, Steve
local.subject.personalNameSerafin, Katy
local.subject.personalNameCazenave, Anny
local.subject.personalNameRahmstorf, Stefan
local.subject.corporateNameInternational Space Science Instituteen


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