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dc.contributor.authorMercene, Floro
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-11T01:59:51Z
dc.date.available2018-09-11T01:59:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-26
dc.identifier.citationMercene, F. (2017, May 26). The ocean is dying (2). Manila Bulletin, p. 12.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2062
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://news.mb.com.ph/2017/05/25/the-ocean-is-dying-2/en
dc.subjectOceansen
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectReefsen
dc.subjectBarrier reefsen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectFossil fuelsen
dc.subjectCarbonen
dc.subjectOilen
dc.subjectNatural gasen
dc.subjectCarbon dioxideen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectSpear fishingen
dc.subjectUnderwater camerasen
dc.subjectMarine scientistsen
dc.titleThe ocean is dying (2)en
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spage12en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMT20170526_12en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThere were many factors that caused the death of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) but among them were drilling for oil and mining and the death blow was global warming. The uncontrolled use of fossil fuels such as carbon, oil, and natural gas dumped hundreds of tons of carbon dioxide in the oceans, raising its temperature that spawned super-typhoons and caused the mass bleaching of corrals. Joshua Jackson visited The Coral Triangle, site of the most diversified marine formations on the planet, where the Philippines belongs, along with Indonesia, Malaysia, and Papua New Guinea in the Solomon Islands.en
local.subject.personalNameJacobsen, Rowan
local.subject.personalNameDavid, Laura


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