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dc.coverage.spatialGermanyen
dc.coverage.spatialPolanden
dc.coverage.spatialSpainen
dc.coverage.spatialPortugalen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T01:15:19Z
dc.date.available2018-09-10T01:15:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-02
dc.identifier.citationAnimals, crops, and people all suffer amid Europe's heatwave. (2018, August 2). Manila Bulletin, p. B-8.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2035
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectFreshwater fishen
dc.subjectMercuryen
dc.subjectRiversen
dc.subjectDissolved oxygenen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectMan-induced effectsen
dc.subjectNuclear power plantsen
dc.subjectBiological poisonsen
dc.subjectWater temperatureen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impacten
dc.titleAnimals, crops, and people all suffer amid Europe's heatwaveen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB-8en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20180802_B-8en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe heatwave gripping large stretches of Europe has already been blamed for deadly forest fires and crop failures. Now freshwater fish could be its next victims. Rivers like the Rhine and the Elbe have soaked up so much heat that fish are beginning to suffocate. In Hamburg, authorities collected almost five metric tons (11,000 pounds) of dead fish from ponds over the weekend, dpa reported. Firefighters have started pumping fresh water into some ponds and lakes in a bid to raise oxygen levels.en
local.subject.personalNameSicher, Philipp
local.subject.personalNameRukwied, Joachim
local.subject.corporateNameGerman Meteorological Officeen
local.subject.corporateNameSwiss Fishery Associationen
local.subject.corporateNameFarmer's Associationen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAssociated Press (AP)en


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