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dc.contributor.authorMercene, Floro
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.coverage.spatialSouth China Seaen
dc.coverage.spatialJapanen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.coverage.spatialIndonesiaen
dc.coverage.spatialMalaysiaen
dc.coverage.spatialThailanden
dc.coverage.spatialTaiwanen
dc.coverage.spatialSouth Koreaen
dc.coverage.spatialAustraliaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-05T03:10:28Z
dc.date.available2018-09-05T03:10:28Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-25
dc.identifier.citationMercene, F. (2015, September 25). South China Sea arms race (1). Manila Bulletin, p. 11.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1979
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectTerritorial watersen
dc.subjectDisputesen
dc.subjectMilitary operationsen
dc.subjectDefence craften
dc.titleSouth China Sea arms race (1)en
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spage11en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20150925_11en
local.seafdecaqd.extractIf there's anybody to blame for a militarily aggressive Japan, it is nobody else but China. For the last 70 years, Japan had remained focused on protecting itself. When China unilaterally claimed the entire South China Sea, the equation in the contested shoal and reef drastically changed. Not only is Japan changing its pacifist constitution to allow its troops to come to the aid of its neighboring allies. There's also an arms race going on, as China ignores all pleas to stop its considerable reclamation of the ocean seabed, turning submerged reefs into islands where they built runways and garrison on them.en
local.subject.personalNameXi, Jinping


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