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dc.contributor.authorOcampo, Yas
dc.coverage.spatialDavaoen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T06:37:37Z
dc.date.available2018-08-22T06:37:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-12
dc.identifier.citationOcampo, Y. (2017, February 12). Plants to clean coastlines. Manila Bulletin, p. 18.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1778
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectCoastsen
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.subjectEnvironmental restorationen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectMarine plantsen
dc.subjectEnvironment managementen
dc.subjectPollution controlen
dc.titlePlants to clean coastlinesen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spage18en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20170212_18en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe Department of Science and Technology (DOST) will embark on a pilot project that aims to sanitize, through natural biological techniques, the residential areas along the city's coasts. A Dutch scientist, who has worked with the agency as an intern, is proposing the use of marshland plants, or helophytes, to naturally filter waste water headed to the sea. The project will work alongside a cheap and profitable public toilet and laundry system.en
local.subject.personalNameLigvoet, Sean
local.subject.corporateNameDepartment of Science and Technology (DOST)en


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