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dc.coverage.spatialHawaiien
dc.coverage.spatialAustraliaen
dc.coverage.spatialMarshall Islandsen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T02:24:49Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T02:24:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-20
dc.identifier.citationUS ignored rising Sea warnings at radar site. (2016, October 20). Manila Bulletin, p. B9.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1731
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectRadaren
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectSea levelen
dc.subjectSea wateren
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectSea wallsen
dc.subjectMilitary operationsen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impacten
dc.subjectSea level changesen
dc.titleUS ignored rising Sea warnings at radar siteen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB9en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20161020_B9en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe United States (US) Air Force is spending nearly $1 billion to build a radar installation that will help keep astronauts and satellites safe by tracking pieces of space junk as small as a baseball. That is, if global warming doesn't get in the way. The space Fence is being constructed on a tiny atoll in the Marshall Islands that the scientists say could be regularly swamped by rising seas within couple of decades as a result of climate change. The salt water could play havoc with the equipment, the scientists say.en
local.subject.personalNameMartin, Lockheed
local.subject.personalNameStorlazzi, Curt
local.subject.personalNameWhalley, Dana
local.subject.corporateNameUnited State Air Forceen
local.subject.corporateNameUnion of Concerned Scientisten


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