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dc.coverage.spatialThailanden
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.coverage.spatialIndonesiaen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-14T02:56:25Z
dc.date.available2018-08-14T02:56:25Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-16
dc.identifier.citationThailand tries to tackle mass of ocean trash. (2017, February 16). Manila Bulletin, p. B9.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1622
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectMarine debrisen
dc.subjectWater pollutionen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectEnvironmental restorationen
dc.subjectPlasticsen
dc.titleThailand tries to tackle mass of ocean trashen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB9en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20170216_B9en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThai authorities are trying to clean up a massive, one-kilometer long tangle of trash, officials said Friday, calling it the largest garbage heap to float through the kingdom's waters. The mass of debris was estimated to weigh some 300 tons, said Sopon Thongdee, deputy director of Thailand's Marine and Coastal Resources Department. Authorities believe much of the detritus was carried into the ocean by floods that swept through Thailand's south in January.en
local.subject.personalNameThongdee, Sopon
local.subject.corporateNameThailand's Marine and Coastal Resources Departmenten
local.subject.corporateNameOcean Conservancyen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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