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dc.coverage.spatialSingaporeen
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen
dc.coverage.spatialJapanen
dc.date.accessioned2024-03-01T05:27:42Z
dc.date.available2024-03-01T05:27:42Z
dc.date.issued2023-05-04
dc.identifier.citation3D printers spawn new kind of fish to fry. (2023, May 4). Philippine Daily Inquirer, pp. A1, A5.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/14274
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Daily Inquirer, Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttps://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1764553/3d-printers-spawn-new-kind-of-fish-to-fryen
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.subjectcell cultureen
dc.subjectgroupersen
dc.subjecteelsen
dc.subjectspawn (eggs)en
dc.title3D printers spawn new kind of fish to fryen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePhilippine Daily Inquireren
dc.citation.spageA1en
dc.citation.epageA5en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPD20230504_A1en
local.seafdecaqd.extractForget your hook, line, and sinker. An Israeli food-tech company says it has 3D printed the first ever ready-to-cook fish fillet using animal cells cultivated and grown in a laboratory. Lab-grown beef and chicken have drawn attention as a way to sidestep the environmental toll of farming and tackle concerns over animal welfare, but few companies have forayed into seafood.en
local.subject.personalNameKaufman, Arik
local.subject.personalNamePershad, Mihir
local.subject.corporateNameUmami Meatsen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorReutersen


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