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dc.contributor.authorSarian, Zac
dc.coverage.spatialMasantol, Pampangaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T05:40:44Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T05:40:44Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-03
dc.identifier.citationSarian, Z. (2017, June 03). Masantol is Pampanga’s crab capital. Manila Bulletin, p. B-7.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/121
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://newsbits.mb.com.ph/2017/06/02/masantol-is-pampangas-crab-capital/en
dc.subjectCrab cultureen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic aspectsen
dc.subjectFish pondsen
dc.subjectTradeen
dc.subjectRiver engineeringen
dc.subjectPricingen
dc.titleMasantol is Pampanga’s crab capitalen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB-7en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB20170603_B7en
local.seafdecaqd.extractMasantol through which the big Pampanga River passes is the province’s undisputed crab capital, Mangrove crabs (formerly called mud crab) are a major product of fishpond operators who manage no less than 12,000 hectares of ponds, according to Crisanto N. Lapaz of the provincial agriculture and fishery council (PAFC). The areas along the river used to be planted to the traditional rice and other crops like corn and vegetables. But when saline water started coming in from the sea, the farmers could no longer grow the crops they used to plant. That’s when they shifted to operating fishponds.en
local.subject.personalNameLapaz, Crisanto N.
local.subject.personalNamePaule, Arthur
local.subject.corporateNameProvincial Agriculture and Fishery Council (PAFC)en
local.subject.corporateNameDepartment of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)en


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