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dc.coverage.spatialParisen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-24T02:35:42Z
dc.date.available2018-07-24T02:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-23
dc.identifier.citationOceans have lost 2 percent of oxygen, says study. (2017, February 23). Manila Bulletin, p. B8.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1085
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Bulletin Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://news.mb.com.ph/2017/02/22/oceans-have-lost-2-percent-of-oxygen-says-study/en
dc.subjectOceansen
dc.subjectAquatic animalsen
dc.subjectAnoxic basinsen
dc.subjectDissolved oxygenen
dc.subjectNitrous oxideen
dc.subjectGreenhouse effecten
dc.subjectOxygenen
dc.subjectMarine ecologyen
dc.subjectHypoxiaen
dc.titleOceans have lost 2 percent of oxygen, says studyen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Bulletinen
dc.citation.spageB8en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMB201702_B8en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe world’s oceans have lost more than two percent of their oxygen since 1960, with potentially devastating consequences for sea plants and animals, marine scientists said Wednesday. In those five and a half decades, parts of the oceans devoid of oxygen, called anoxic waters, have quadrupled, said a study in the science journal Nature. And the production and flow of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas, “will probably have increased,” it said. Oceans cover nearly three-quarters of the Earth’s surface, provide about half of the oxygen we breathe and feed billions of people every year.en
local.subject.personalNameGilbert, Denis
local.subject.corporateNameFisheries and Oceans Canadaen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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