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dc.coverage.spatialHong Kongen
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.coverage.spatialMalaysiaen
dc.coverage.spatialBruneien
dc.coverage.spatialTaiwanen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-19T01:30:32Z
dc.date.available2018-07-19T01:30:32Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-14
dc.identifier.citationRuling won't stop plundering of sea, say experts. (2016, July 14). Philippine Daily Inquirer, p. A9.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/972
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Daily Inquirer, Inc.en
dc.subjectDisputesen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectIllegal fishingen
dc.subjectMarine resourcesen
dc.subjectEnvironment managementen
dc.subjectNature conservationen
dc.subjectLand reclamationen
dc.subjectArtificial islandsen
dc.subjectRare speciesen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impacten
dc.subjectTerritorial watersen
dc.titleRuling won't stop plundering of sea, say expertsen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePhilippine Daily Inquireren
dc.citation.spageA9en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPD20160714_A9en
local.seafdecaqd.extractAn international tribunal's ruling that China has caused severe harm to coral reefs and endangered species in the South China Sea will not stop further damage to an already plundered ecosystem, according to scientists and academics. "China will take no notice of the Hague ruling," Brian Morton, emeritus professor of Marine Ecology at Hong Kong University, told Rueters. William Cheung, associate professor at University of British Columbia, said marine resources would still be at risk.en
local.subject.personalNameMorton, Brian
local.subject.personalNameCheung, William
local.subject.corporateNamePermanent Court of Arbitration in The Hagueen


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