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dc.coverage.spatialFloridaen
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-19T16:11:39Z
dc.date.available2020-04-19T16:11:39Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-19
dc.identifier.citationProperty crisis looms due to sea level rise. (2018, June 19). BusinessWorld, p. S2/4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/8317
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBusinessWorld Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://www.bworldonline.com/us-property-crisis-looms-due-to-sea-level-rise-experts-warn/en
dc.subjectSea level changesen
dc.subjectSea levelen
dc.subjectFloodsen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectFloodingen
dc.subjectHigh tideen
dc.titleProperty crisis looms due to sea level riseen
dc.title.alternativeUS property crisis looms due to sea level rise, experts warnen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleBusinessWorlden
dc.citation.spageS2/4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberBW20180619_S2/4en
local.seafdecaqd.extractAlong Florida’s sun-splashed shorelines, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are “not in a flood zone,” meaning no flood insurance is required. But experts warn that ignoring sea level rise won’t prevent a looming economic crisis caused by water-logged homes that will someday become unsafe, uninhabitable and too costly to insure. A reality check may come sooner than many may think, according to a report out Monday by the Union of Concerned Scientists, which finds as many as 64,000 coastal residences worth $26 billion in Florida are at risk of chronic flooding in the next 30 years, the life of a typical mortgage.en
local.subject.personalNameCleetus, Rachel
local.subject.corporateNameUnion of Concerned Scientists (UCS)en


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