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dc.contributor.authorvan Beijnen, Jonah
dc.contributor.authorYan, Gregg
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T08:37:43Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T08:37:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-02
dc.identifier.citationvan Beijnen, J. & Yan, G. (2019, June 2). BFAR team makes global headlines in fish culturing. The Philippine Star, p. B4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/7299
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttps://www.philstar.com/business/agriculture/2019/06/02/1922822/bfar-team-makes-global-headlines-fish-culturingen
dc.subjectfish cultureen
dc.subjectaquacultureen
dc.subjectCarnivoresen
dc.subjectMarine fishen
dc.subjectmarine crustaceansen
dc.subjectenvironmental impacten
dc.subjectHerbivorous fishen
dc.subjectmilkfish cultureen
dc.subjecthatcheriesen
dc.subjectsurvivalen
dc.subjectcagesen
dc.subjectbrackishwater aquacultureen
dc.titleBFAR team makes global headlines in fish culturingen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spageB4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20190602_B4en
local.seafdecaqd.extractGlobally, the culture of carnivorous marine finfish and crustaceans receives the most interest from constitutional investors, with species groups like sea bass, salmon and shrimp showing double-digit growth rates. These species are enjoying high demand from western and Chinese customers and fetch relatively high prices. Their culture, however, comes with high environmental impacts. Large amounts of fishmeal are typically required as feeds, and it is estimated that at present, a quarter of all fish landed globally – a whopping 21 million tons annually – are caught for the fishmeal industry.en
local.subject.personalNameRosario, Westly


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