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dc.coverage.spatialAlaskaen
dc.coverage.spatialCaliforniaen
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T03:07:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-05T03:07:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-18
dc.identifier.citationWhale deaths on US West Coast may be linked to Arctic warmth. (2019, May 18). Panay News, p. B10.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/7032
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPanay News, Inc.en
dc.subjectMarine mammalsen
dc.subjectCarcassesen
dc.subjectMortality causesen
dc.titleWhale deaths on US West Coast may be linked to Arctic warmthen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePanay Newsen
dc.citation.spageB10en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPN20190518_B10en
local.seafdecaqd.extractDozens of gray whales have been found dead along the U.S. West Coast in recent weeks and some scientists believe the cause lies far to the north, in the heated-up Arctic waters off Alaska. Fifty-eight gray whales have been found stranded and dead so far this year in sites stretching from California to Alaska, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The latest discovery announced on Wednesday by NOAA was a dead gray whale in Turnagain Arm, a narrow glacier-fed channel off Anchorage where gray whales rarely venture.en
local.subject.personalNameMilstein, Michael
local.subject.personalNameThoman, Rick
local.subject.corporateNameNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)en
local.subject.corporateNameAlaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policyen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorReutersen


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