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dc.coverage.spatialVirginiaen
dc.coverage.spatialOrlandoen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-02T07:00:42Z
dc.date.available2019-09-02T07:00:42Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-23
dc.identifier.citationSunScreen ingredient is toxic to coral, killing off reefs. (2015, October 23-24). BusinessWorld, p. S2/4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/6960
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBusinessWorld Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectToxicityen
dc.subjectCoralen
dc.subjectReefsen
dc.subjectScientific personnelen
dc.subjectDNAen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectCoral reef conservationen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectNature conservationen
dc.titleSunScreen ingredient is toxic to coral, killing off reefsen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleBusinessWorlden
dc.citation.spageS2/4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberBW20151023_S2/4en
local.seafdecaqd.extractA common ingredient found in sunscreen is toxic to coral and contributing to the decline of reefs around the world, according to new research published on Tuesday. Oxybenzone, a UV-filtering chemical compound found in 3,500 brands of sunscreen worldwide, can be fatal to baby coral and damaging to adults in high concentrations, according to the study published in the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. The international research team that conducted the study, led by Craig Downs, found the highest concentrations of oxybenzone around coral reefs popular with tourists, particularly those in Hawaii and the Caribbean.en
local.subject.personalNameDowns, Craig
local.subject.corporateNameArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicologyen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorReutersen


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