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dc.contributor.authorHalton, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T08:01:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-04T08:01:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-20
dc.identifier.citationHalton, M. (2018, April 20). Heatwaves 'cook' Great Barrier Reef corals. Panay News, p. 12.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/650
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPanay News, Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttps://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43801895en
dc.subjectReefsen
dc.subjectAlgaeen
dc.subjectHeaten
dc.subjectSurveyingen
dc.subjectTemperatureen
dc.subjectCoralen
dc.subjectEnergyen
dc.subjectColouren
dc.subjectAerial surveysen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectHeaten
dc.subjectBiological stressen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectEnvironmentsen
dc.subjectEcosystemsen
dc.titleHeatwaves 'cook' Great Barrier Reef coralsen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePanay Newsen
dc.citation.spage12en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPN20180420_12en
local.seafdecaqd.extractProlonged ocean warming events, known as marine heatwaves, take a significant toll on the complex ecosystem of the Great Barrier Reef. This occurs when the stress of elevated temperatures causes a breakdown of the coral's symbiotic relationship with its algae, which provide the coral with energy to survive, and give the reef its distinctive colors.en
local.subject.personalNameHughes, Terry
local.subject.personalNameHeron, Scott
local.subject.personalNameCziesielski, Maha
local.subject.personalNameWiedenmann, Jörg
local.subject.corporateNameAustralia's ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studiesen
local.subject.corporateNameNoaa Coral Reef Watchen
local.subject.corporateNameKing Abdullah University of Science and Technologyen
local.subject.corporateNameUniversity of Southampton's Coral Reef Laboratoryen


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