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dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03T05:35:45Z
dc.date.available2018-07-03T05:35:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-16
dc.identifier.citationIn the name of conservation: Eavesdropping on fish sex. (2017, June 16). Business World, p. 6/S3.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/572
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBusinessWorld Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttp://bworldonline.com/in-the-name-of-conservation-eavesdropping-on-fish-sex/en
dc.subjectFish countersen
dc.subjectNatural populationsen
dc.subjectBreeding seasonsen
dc.subjectBreedingen
dc.subjectThreatened speciesen
dc.subjectOverfishingen
dc.subjectSound measurementen
dc.subjectMathematical modelsen
dc.subjectPopulation densityen
dc.titleIn the name of conservation: Eavesdropping on fish sexen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleBusinessWorlden
dc.citation.spage6/S3en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberBW20170616_6en
local.seafdecaqd.extractScientists recently unveiled a unique new method for counting stocks of threatened fish — eavesdropping on their love calls when the fish gather in massive mating throngs. Using underwater microphones and mathematical models, researchers from the US and Mexico were able to estimate population numbers for the Gulf corvina, a popular eating fish from Mexico’s Gulf of California. About two million corvina gather every spring for a frenzied breeding session in a shallow estuary of the Colorado River Delta — bringing the entire adult population to an area less than 1% of its usual home range.en
local.subject.personalNameErisman, Brad
local.subject.corporateNameUniversity of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI)en
local.subject.corporateNameInternational Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)en


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