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dc.coverage.spatialTaclobanen
dc.coverage.spatialLas Piñasen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T00:27:20Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T00:27:20Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-03
dc.identifier.citationBarriers to disaster. (2014, August 3). The Philippine Star, p. 16.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/5165
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttps://www.philstar.com/opinion/2014/08/03/1353247/editorial-barriers-disasteren
dc.subjectmangrovesen
dc.subjectFloodsen
dc.subjectdisastersen
dc.subjectbiodiversityen
dc.subjectstorm surge barriersen
dc.subjectstorm surgesen
dc.subjecthurricanesen
dc.subjectglobal warmingen
dc.subjectecotourismen
dc.subjectenvironmental protectionen
dc.titleBarriers to disasteren
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spage16en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20140803_16en
local.seafdecaqd.extractFilipinos were mostly unfamiliar with storm surges, until one struck the bay area of Manila in September 2011. The force of the surge, with waves as high as 20 feet, destroyed hotel fronts and Manila’s Baywalk, and submerged the western section of the city all the way to Taft Avenue in several inches of water. That surge, however, was nothing to the one that flattened Tacloban City and several other areas of Leyte and Samar a year ago this month. Today memories of the typhoon have encouraged the development of more disaster-resilient dwellings and public infrastructure. There’s another tool for storm surge resilience, however, that has so far been generally overlooked: the propagation of mangrove forests around vulnerable areas.en
local.subject.personalNameVillar, Cynthia


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