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dc.coverage.spatialGreat Barrier Reefen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-02T05:39:36Z
dc.date.available2018-07-02T05:39:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-27
dc.identifier.citationBarrier reef 'too big to fail'. (2017, June 27). Manila Standard, p. C3.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/502
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Manila Standard Publishing, Inc.en
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectCoral reef conservationen
dc.subjectEconomic analysisen
dc.subjectVulnerable marine ecosystemsen
dc.subjectEcotourismen
dc.subjectCoral reef restorationen
dc.titleBarrier reef 'too big to fail'en
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Standarden
dc.citation.spageC3en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMS20170627_C3en
local.seafdecaqd.extractAustralia’s under-pressure Great Barrier Reef is an asset worth Aus$56 billion (US$42 billion) and as an ecosystem and economic driver is “too big to fail,” a study said Monday. The World Heritage-listed reef is the largest living structure on Earth and its economic and social value was calculated for the first time in the Deloitte Access Economics report commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. Using economic modelling, it said the reef was worth Aus$29 billion to tourism, supporting 64,000 jobs.en
local.subject.personalNameSargent, Steve
local.subject.personalNameGore, Al
local.subject.personalNameO'Mahony, John
local.subject.corporateNameGreat Barrier Reef Foundationen
local.subject.corporateNameUnited Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)en
local.subject.corporateNameAdanien


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