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dc.coverage.spatialChesapeake Bayen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T02:15:14Z
dc.date.available2019-03-21T02:15:14Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-07
dc.identifier.citationDiners eat oysters from polluted bay. (2014 April 7). Manila Standard, p. B4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/5015
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManila Standarden
dc.relation.urihttp://www.manilastandard.net/news/world-news/144620/diners-eat-oysters-from-polluted-bay.htmlen
dc.subjectwater pollutionen
dc.subjectmarine molluscsen
dc.subjectFilter feedersen
dc.titleDiners eat oysters from polluted bayen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Standarden
dc.citation.spageB4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMS20140407_B4en
local.seafdecaqd.extractCage after cage, oysters destined for a sprinkling of lemon juice and a delighted diner are pulled from the majestic Chesapeake Bay, where 20 years ago they had nearly disappeared.“Those will be at the restaurants tomorrow,” says Tal Petty, 55, an oysterman who has worked these waters for 40 years. Today, the mollusk’s reintroduction is playing a vital role in the health of the bay and Petty is quick to point out the dual ecological and gastronomical benefits.en
local.subject.personalNamePetty, Tal
local.subject.personalNameSmith, John
local.subject.personalNameAllen, Steve
local.subject.corporateNameOyster Recovery Partnership (ORP)en
local.subject.scientificNameCrassostrea virginicaen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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