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dc.contributor.authorTorres, Rebecca S.
dc.coverage.spatialAlaskaen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-13T02:06:35Z
dc.date.available2019-03-13T02:06:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-15
dc.identifier.citationTorres. R. S. (2018, November 15). Alaskan salmon bagoong, unexpectedly. BusinessWorld, p. S2/9.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/4826
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBusinessWorld Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://www.bworldonline.com/alaskan-salmon-bagoong-unexpectedly/en
dc.subjectSeafooden
dc.subjectFermented productsen
dc.subjectMinced productsen
dc.subjectFermentationen
dc.titleAlaskan salmon bagoong, unexpectedlyen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleBusinessWorlden
dc.citation.spageS2/9en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberBW20181115_S2/9en
local.seafdecaqd.extractNanay Leonor hails from the town of Sta. Lucia in Ilocos Sur and she worked as a seafood processor at a salmon cannery in Alaska for over 15 years together with other Ilokano kababayans, people hailing from the same Philippine province. Being an Ilokano, she is hardworking, thrifty, and determined. Alaska is the largest state in the United States with an extensive span of maritime border and coastline. Those bodies of water are the rich source of different salmon varieties that are among Alaska’s main seafood exports as well as cod, pollock, and crab.en


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