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dc.coverage.spatialAustraliaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-12T08:10:31Z
dc.date.available2019-03-12T08:10:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-29
dc.identifier.citationGreat barrier reef gets biggest coral re-seeding. (2018, November 29). The Manila Times, p. B6.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/4813
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Manila Times Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttps://www.manilatimes.net/great-barrier-reef-gets-biggest-coral-re-seeding/474984/en
dc.subjectBarrier reefsen
dc.subjectScientific personnelen
dc.subjectSpawningen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectCoral reef restorationen
dc.subjectCoralen
dc.titleGreat barrier reef gets biggest coral re-seedingen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Manila Timesen
dc.citation.spageB6en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMT20181129_B6en
local.seafdecaqd.extractScientists have launched the largest-ever attempt to regenerate coral on the endangered Great Barrier Reef by harvesting millions of the creatures’ eggs and sperm during their annual spawning. The researchers said Wednesday they plan to grow coral larvae from the harvested eggs and return these to areas of the reef which have been badly damaged by climate-related coral bleaching. “This is the first time that the entire process of large scale larval rearing and settlement will be undertaken directly on reefs on the Great Barrier Reef,” said Peter Harrison of Southern Cross University, one of the project leaders.en
local.subject.personalNameHarrison, Peter
local.subject.corporateNameSouthern Cross Universityen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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