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dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-22T07:27:06Z
dc.date.available2019-01-22T07:27:06Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-30
dc.identifier.citation'Water monster' faces extinction. (2014, January 30). Panay News, p. A19.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/3778
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPanay News, Inc.en
dc.subjectAquatic animalsen
dc.subjectLakesen
dc.subjectAquariaen
dc.subjectSpecies extinctionen
dc.title'Water monster' faces extinctionen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePanay Newsen
dc.citation.spageA19en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPN20140130_A19en
local.seafdecaqd.extractMexico's salamander-like axolotl may have disappeared from its only known natural habitat in Mexico City's few remaining lakes. It's disturbing news for an admittedly ugly creature, which has a slimy tail, plumage-like gills and mouth that curls into an odd smile. The axolotl is known as the "water monster" and the "Mexican walking fish."en
local.subject.personalNameGarza, Armando Tovar
local.subject.corporateNameMexico's National Autonomous Univesityen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAssociated Press (AP)en


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