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dc.coverage.spatialSouth China Seaen
dc.coverage.spatialJakartaen
dc.coverage.spatialBruneien
dc.coverage.spatialMalaysiaen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.coverage.spatialTaiwanen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.coverage.spatialSpratly Islandsen
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-06T06:52:23Z
dc.date.available2018-11-06T06:52:23Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-22
dc.identifier.citationUS: Sea reclamation can lead to conflict. (2015 May 22). The Philippine Star, pp. 1, 11.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2690
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.subjectLand reclamationen
dc.subjectDisputesen
dc.subjectTerritorial watersen
dc.subjectSatellite sensingen
dc.subjectMilitary operationsen
dc.titleUS: Sea reclamation can lead to conflicten
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spage1en
dc.citation.epage11en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20150522_1en
local.seafdecaqd.extractChina’s land reclamation around reefs in the disputed South China Sea is undermining freedom and stability, and risks provoking tension that could even lead to conflict, US Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken told a conference in Jakarta. China claims 90 percent of the South China Sea, which is believed to be rich in oil and gas, its claims overlapping with those of Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan. Recent satellite images suggest China has made rapid progress in filling in land in contested territory in the Spratly islands and in building an airstrip suitable for military use and that it may be planning another.en
local.subject.personalNameKerry, John
local.subject.personalNameBlinken, Antony
local.subject.personalNameHong, Lei
dc.contributor.corporateauthorReutersen


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