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dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.coverage.spatialPhilippinesen
dc.coverage.spatialSouth China Seaen
dc.coverage.spatialMalaysiaen
dc.coverage.spatialBruneien
dc.coverage.spatialTaiwanen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T03:30:58Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T03:30:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-25
dc.identifier.citationNo militarization in disputed sea - China. (2017, March 25). The Philippine Star, p. 6.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2584
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.subjectDisputesen
dc.subjectTerritorial watersen
dc.subjectNavigationen
dc.subjectDefence craften
dc.subjectMilitary operationsen
dc.titleNo militarization in disputed sea - Chinaen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spage6en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20170325_6en
local.seafdecaqd.extractChina is not militarizing the South China Sea, Premier Li Keqiang said yesterday, although he acknowledged that defense equipment on islands in the disputed waterway had been placed there to maintain “freedom of navigation”. China has drawn international criticism for large-scale building in the South China Sea, although Li told reporters in Australia the development was for civilian purposes only.en
local.subject.personalNameLi, Keqiang
dc.contributor.corporateauthorReutersen


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