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dc.coverage.spatialViennaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-18T01:28:15Z
dc.date.available2018-10-18T01:28:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-27
dc.identifier.citationHumans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater - study. (2017, April 27). Philippine Star, p. B7.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2426
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.subjectGround wateren
dc.subjectMan-induced effectsen
dc.subjectPollutionen
dc.subjectFossilsen
dc.subjectAquifersen
dc.subjectWater pollutionen
dc.titleHumans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater - studyen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spageB7en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20170427_B7en
local.seafdecaqd.extractHuman activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource. Even at depths of more than 250 meters under the Earth’s surface, so-called “fossil” groundwater – more than 12,000 years old – has been found to contain traces of present-day rainwater, they said. This suggests that deep wells, believed to bring only unsullied, ancient water to the surface, are “vulnerable to contaminants derived from modern-day land uses,” study co-author Scott Jasechko, of the University of Calgary, told AFP.en
local.subject.personalNameJasechko, Scott
local.subject.corporateNameEuropean Geosciences Unionen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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