Show simple item record

dc.coverage.spatialNorth Charlestonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-09T02:55:43Z
dc.date.available2018-10-09T02:55:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-24
dc.identifier.citationToothless, dwarf dolphin, a case study evolution. (2017, August 24). Philippine Daily Inquirer, p. A13.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2360
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Daily Inquirer, Inc.en
dc.subjectAquatic mammalsen
dc.subjectCetologyen
dc.subjectEcholocationen
dc.titleToothless, dwarf dolphin, a case study evolutionen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePhilippine Daily Inquireren
dc.citation.spageA13en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPD20170824_A13en
local.seafdecaqd.extractScientists unveiled today an extinct species of toothless, whiskered and objectively cute mini-dolphin that plied Earth's oceans some 30 million years ago. With only a fossilised cranium -- found in a river near Charleston, South Carolina -- to work with, the researchers were able to reconstruct the snub-nosed mammal's evolutionary saga, describe its facial features and figure out what it snacked on. Just over a metre (three feet) from snout to tail, Inermorostrum xenops was half the size of the common bottlenose dolphin.en
local.subject.scientificNameInermorostrum xenopsen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record