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dc.coverage.spatialEl Nidoen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-27T01:40:16Z
dc.date.available2018-09-27T01:40:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-08
dc.identifier.citationEl Nido Resorts guides turn Bacuit Bay into tourist attraction. (2017, May 8). Philippine Star, p. E5.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/2267
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttps://www.pressreader.com/philippines/the-philippine-star/20170508/282772061482184en
dc.subjectEcotourismen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectRecreationen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.titleEl Nido Resorts guides turn Bacuit Bay into tourist attractionen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spageE5en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20170508_E5en
local.seafdecaqd.extractEl Nido Resorts guides from Miniloc, Lagen and Pangulasian in Bacuit Bay, and those in Apulit, the fourth El Nido Resort in the Sulu Sea, are among the best trained in creating awareness and fostering appreciation for marine biodiversity in the Philippines. Their long hours of study and passion for underwater habitats is such that they often convince even non-swimmers to snorkel for the first time. Eventually, the Bacuit Bay reef and the rest of Palawan broke off from Asia, drifting on the Sunda Plate immersed in seawater. As the tectonic plate turned clockwise some five million years ago, Palawan was hurled towards what we now know as the Philippine archipelago, which is a mere 50 million years old. Today El Nido’s guides take guests snorkeling in Bacuit, their job facilitated by the relative shallowness of the bay and its diversity of marine habitats.en
local.subject.personalNameGoldman, Lee


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