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dc.coverage.spatialWashingtonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-24T02:56:06Z
dc.date.available2018-08-24T02:56:06Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-18
dc.identifier.citationEveryone needs the oceans to be protected. (2016, September 18). Manila Standard, pp. A3, A4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1824
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Manila Standard Publishing, Inc.en
dc.subjectCommercial fishingen
dc.subjectFishery protectionen
dc.subjectOceansen
dc.subjectMiningen
dc.subjectCarbon dioxideen
dc.subjectOverfishingen
dc.subjectDeep wateren
dc.subjectAcidificationen
dc.subjectShellfishen
dc.subjectProtected areasen
dc.subjectSustainable fishingen
dc.subjectFishing rightsen
dc.subjectIllegal fishingen
dc.subjectConsumersen
dc.subjectFishing vesselsen
dc.subjectIllegal fishingen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.titleEveryone needs the oceans to be protecteden
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Standarden
dc.citation.spageA3en
dc.citation.epageA4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMS20160918_A3en
local.seafdecaqd.extractEnsuring that these ecosystems stay healthy is getting harder, as the oceans absorb excess carbon dioxide and overfishing escalates, aided by advances in deep-water fishing technology. Carbon dioxide turns the water more acidic, threatening the survival of shellfish. Hundreds of marine species are now endangered, and populations of large predatory fish are dropping. A new satellite-driven interactive tool called Global Fishing Watch will enable governments to track tens of thousands of fishing vessels worldwide and detect illegal fishing.en
local.subject.personalNameObama, Barack
dc.contributor.corporateauthorBloombergen


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