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dc.coverage.spatialAntibesen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-06T08:27:28Z
dc.date.available2018-08-06T08:27:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-01
dc.identifier.citationKiller whale in France mimics human speech. (2018, February 1). Manila Standard, p. B3.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1440
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Manila Standard Publishing, Inc.en
dc.subjectAquatic mammalsen
dc.subjectVocalization behaviouren
dc.subjectSound productionen
dc.subjectAnimal communicationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectCetologyen
dc.subjectMimicryen
dc.titleKiller whale in France mimics human speechen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Standarden
dc.citation.spageB3en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMS20180201_B3en
local.seafdecaqd.extractHer head above water, Wikie the killer whale looks at the human trainer next to her pool, listens, then loudly vocalizes: "Hello." It is not a perfect imitation, but, astonishingly, recognizable. It is the first scientific demonstration of an orca mimicking human words, which also included "Amy" - the name of Wikie's handler-"Bye-Bye" and "one-two-three". "We were not expecting a perfect match, like a parrot," researcher Jose Abramson of the Complutense University of Madrid said of the experiment reported Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.en
local.subject.personalNameAbramson, Jose
local.subject.corporateNameComplutense University of Madriden
local.subject.corporateNameMarineland Aquariumen


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