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dc.coverage.spatialShikine Islanden
dc.coverage.spatialGreat Barrier Reefen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-15T07:47:06Z
dc.date.available2018-03-15T07:47:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-18
dc.identifier.citationVolcanic island may hold key to coral survival. (2017, April 18). Manila Standard, p. C4.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/129
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Manila Standard Publishing, Inc.en
dc.subjectCoral reefsen
dc.subjectCoral reef conservationen
dc.subjectSubmarine volcanoesen
dc.subjectAcidificationen
dc.subjectCoral bleachingen
dc.subjectResearch vesselsen
dc.subjectExpeditionsen
dc.titleVolcanic island may hold key to coral survivalen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleManila Standarden
dc.citation.spageC4en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMS20170418_C4en
local.seafdecaqd.extractTara, Japan – The key to the survival of the world’s threatened coral reefs may lie in the waters surrounding a small volcanic island off the coast of Japan, scientists say. The seabed of Shikine Island is a “living laboratory” for researchers aboard the schooner Tara, a French-led scientific expedition, who are looking for clues to help protect coral from the damaging effects of climate change. While coral reefs cover less than 0.2 percent of the ocean surface globally, they host some 30 percent of marine animal and plant species, serving as a source of food and offering protection from predators.en
local.subject.personalNameAgostini, Sylvain
local.subject.personalNameNugues, Maggy
local.subject.personalNameBlake, Peter
local.subject.corporateNameUniversity of Tsukubaen
local.subject.corporateNameEcole Pratique des Hautes Etudesen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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