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dc.coverage.spatialCaliforniaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T05:56:31Z
dc.date.available2018-07-31T05:56:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-09
dc.identifier.citationBig gulp: feeding strategy of blue whales revealed. (2015, October 9). BusinessWorld, p. 4/S3.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1298
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBusinessWorld Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectAquatic mammalsen
dc.subjectTagsen
dc.subjectTrackingen
dc.subjectPredationen
dc.subjectOxygenen
dc.subjectRare speciesen
dc.subjectWhalingen
dc.titleBig gulp: feeding strategy of blue whales revealeden
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleBusinessWorlden
dc.citation.spage4/S3en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberBW20151009_4/S3en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe blue whale is the largest creature on Earth and perhaps the biggest that ever lived, so it is no surprise it has a huge appetite. But the strategies this behemoth uses to get enough food has not been well understood - until now. Scientists said on Friday a study of blue whales off California’s coast that used tags to track their movements and their prey, tiny shrimp-like crustaceans called krill, showed these marine mammals are not indiscriminate grazers as long though. Instead, they feed more intensely when krill density is high but avoid doing so when there is less krill in order to save oxygen for future dives.en
local.subject.personalNameHazen, Elliott
local.subject.personalNameFriedlaender, Ari
local.subject.corporateNameU.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries’ Southwest Fisheries Science Centeren
local.subject.corporateNameUniversity of California Santa Cruzen
local.subject.corporateNameOregon State University’s Marine Mammal Instituteen


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