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dc.coverage.spatialMiamien
dc.coverage.spatialNew Orleansen
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen
dc.coverage.spatialNorfolken
dc.coverage.spatialFloridaen
dc.coverage.spatialCaliforniaen
dc.coverage.spatialLouisianaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T00:57:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T00:57:56Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-15
dc.identifier.citationSea level rise will swallow Miami, New Orleans - study. (2015, October 15). Manila Times, p. A6.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1232
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Manila Times Publishing Corporationen
dc.subjectSea level changesen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectRenewable resourcesen
dc.subjectCoastal zoneen
dc.subjectFossil fuelsen
dc.subjectCarbonen
dc.subjectIce meltingen
dc.subjectEnvironmental impacten
dc.subjectMan-induced effectsen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.subjectSea levelen
dc.titleSea level rise will swallow Miami, New Orleans - studyen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Manila Timesen
dc.citation.spageA6en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberMT20151015_A6en
local.seafdecaqd.extractSay goodbye to Miami and New Orleans. No matter what we do to curb global warming, these and other beloved US cities will sink below rising seas, according to a study today. But making extreme carbon cuts and moving to renewable energy could save millions of people living in iconic coastal areas of the United States, said the findings in the October 12 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal.en
local.subject.personalNameStrauss, Ben
local.subject.personalNameHansen, James
local.subject.personalNameMann, Michael


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