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dc.coverage.spatialAustraliaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T00:21:59Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T00:21:59Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-14
dc.identifier.citationFood chain collapse predicted in oceans. (2015, October 14). Panay News, p. 8.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1227
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPanay News, Inc.en
dc.subjectFood chainsen
dc.subjectOceansen
dc.subjectCarbon dioxideen
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.subjectMarine resourcesen
dc.subjectAcidificationen
dc.subjectBiodiversityen
dc.subjectMetabolismen
dc.subjectPlanktonen
dc.subjectGlobal warmingen
dc.subjectAnalysisen
dc.subjectEnvironmental protectionen
dc.titleFood chain collapse predicted in oceansen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePanay Newsen
dc.citation.spage8en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPN20151014_8en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe world's oceans are teeming with life, but rising carbon dioxide emissions could cause a collapse in the marine food chain from the top down, researchers in Australia said. Marine ecologists from the University of Adelaide reviewed more than 600 published studies on coral reefs, kelp forests, open oceans, and tropical and arctic waters. Their meta-analysis, published in the Oct. 12 edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that ocean acidification and warming will cut down on the diversity and numbers of various key species.en
local.subject.personalNameNagelkerken, Ivan
local.subject.corporateNameUniversity of Adelaideen
dc.contributor.corporateauthorAgence France-Presse (AFP)en


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