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dc.coverage.spatialHimalayasen
dc.coverage.spatialBhutanen
dc.coverage.spatialNortheast Indiaen
dc.coverage.spatialNepalen
dc.coverage.spatialNorth Myanmaren
dc.coverage.spatialSouthern TIbeten
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T06:24:05Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T06:24:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-07
dc.identifier.citationSneezing monkey, walking fish found in Himalayas. (2015, October 7). Philippine Star, p. A-21.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1220
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Star Printing Co., Inc.en
dc.subjectNature conservationen
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.subjectSpeciesen
dc.subjectNew speciesen
dc.subjectThreatened speciesen
dc.subjectDeforestationen
dc.subjectMiningen
dc.subjectHabitaten
dc.subjectEcosystemsen
dc.subjectSustainable developmenten
dc.subjectClimatic changesen
dc.titleSneezing monkey, walking fish found in Himalayasen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitleThe Philippine Staren
dc.citation.spageA-21en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPS20151007_A-21en
local.seafdecaqd.extractA monkey that sneezes when it rains and a "walking" fish are among more than 200 species discovered in the fragile eastern Himalayas in recent years, according to conservation group World Wildlife Foundation(WWF). WWF has compiled a survey of wildlife discovered by scientists across Bhutan, northeast India, Nepal, north Myanmar and southern Tibet in a bid to raise awareness of the threats facing the ecologically sensitive region. The species include what the WWF described as a blue-colored "walking snakehead fish", which can breathe air, survive on land for four days and slither up to 400 meters (a quarter of a mile) on wet ground.en
local.subject.corporateNameWorld Wildlife Foundation (WWF)en


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