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dc.contributor.authorGo, Antonio Calipjo
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T00:40:38Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T00:40:38Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-02
dc.identifier.citationGo, A. C. (2015, June 2). The cycle of birth, death and rebirth. Philippine Daily Inquirer, p. E3.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12174/1147
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPhilippine Daily Inquirer, Inc.en
dc.relation.urihttp://newsinfo.inquirer.net/695348/the-cycle-of-birth-death-and-rebirthen
dc.subjectGastropod fisheriesen
dc.subjectShellsen
dc.subjectAquatic animalsen
dc.subjectDesiccationen
dc.subjectAestivationen
dc.subjectMetabolismen
dc.subjectHibernationen
dc.subjectCold seasonen
dc.subjectLife cycleen
dc.titleThe cycle of birth, death and rebirthen
dc.typenewspaperArticleen
dc.citation.journalTitlePhilippine Daily Inquireren
dc.citation.spageE3en
local.seafdecaqd.controlnumberPD20150602_E3en
local.seafdecaqd.extractThe operculum is a hard and horny structure that exists in many marine and freshwater snails. It is attached to the foot of the mollusk and serves as a trapdoor that closes the aperture of the shell when the soft parts of the animal are retracted. It is generally oval or circular in shape and fits snugly to the aperture of the shell, effectively sealing off the entrance. A small air hole allows for breathing, especially during estivation. The operculum’s most important functions are to prevent desiccation or drying out while the animal is estivating and to protect it from its predators. Instances of symbolic death are manifested by animals and plants living in the natural world.en


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